Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Comp Titles

Ah, the grueling process of querying. It's fun, right? But let's talk about comp titles. This is when you take a book already on the market and compare it to your work. But it's kind of a double-edged sword. If you say, "my book is reminiscent of HARRY POTTER," the agent sees, "Oh look at me! I'm going to be a best seller! I'm the new J.K. Rowling. La-de-da!"

But if you say, "My book is in the vein of BOOK NO ONE'S HEARD OF," the agent goes, "What is this book? Does the author even know their market?"

Some agents like comp titles. Some don't. The point is, agents aren't just one cookie-cutter person. They're all unique human beings. To play it safe, I've generally opted to leave out the comp titles. If my work (and query) is good enough, it will speak for itself.

Dear Agent (where you of course put in the agent's real name,)

I see from your website you're actively seeking YA fantasy, and I am excited to present MY BOOK, a YA fantasy romance for your review. Told from the viewpoint of a frog turned prince, it's complete at 75,000 words.

From there straight into the query.

But if you do use comp titles, which I have, I think it's best to use them very, very carefully.

Dear Agent (where you of course put in the agent's real name,)

I see from your website you're actively seeking YA fantasy, and I am excited to present MY BOOK, a YA fantasy romance for your review. Told from the viewpoint of a frog turned prince, it's complete at 75,000 words, and I believe, will appeal to fans of Marissa Meyer's, CINDER.

Key words: I believe, will appeal to
In other words, I'm saying, "This is just my opinion. People who like CINDER might also like my book." It shows you have some knowledge of your market without coming off as someone with delusions of grandeur. 

You can also call out one of the agent's own books. 

Dear Mary,

I am a huge fan of your client, John Smith's book, THE RELUCTANT PRINCESS, and I am excited to present my YA fantasy romance for your review. I definitely took inspiration from John's work, especially in his fantastic world building. Told from the viewpoint of a frog turned prince, MY BOOK is complete at 75,000 words.

I always find a little brown-nosing never hurts. You've also shown you know your market, and you've done your research on the agent. But this could also backfire. If your work is too similar to John Smith's, the agent could pass simply because she already has a John Smith. Why does she need two?

I generally take it agent by agent. If you find a call out you can use, use it. If not, I've never had any issues with keeping things generic. If your writing is good enough, it will make it past the gates. If not, that's where you really need to focus your time.  

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